Efficiency in Agriculture - Hydraulic Doors Keeping Pace with Technology

There was a time when oxen and horses were used for power, basic wooden plows tilled the fields, all sowing was done by hand, cultivating was done by hoe, and hay and grain was cut with sickles. By 1837, John Deere and Leonard Andrus began manufacturing steel plows and a practical threshing machine was patented. The first gasoline tractor was built by John Froelich 1892 and the first commercially successful (gasoline-powered) general purpose tractor in was in production.

 

 

From 1920-1940, farm production made large strides. The use of mechanized power expanded and by the 50’s the number of tractors on farms finally exceeded the number horses and mules for the first time. The 60’s saw 96% of cotton harvested mechanically, and the 70’s and 80’s brought self-propelled combines, and more efficient equipment. By the 90’s, farmers were using satellite technology to track and plan their farming practices. The new millennium has advanced agricultural technology to an even further by introducing smart phones, tablets and portable computers to the cabs of tractors, trucks and combines. It’s a new world for farmers.

 

Over the past century, agriculture has been strongly influenced by enhanced mechanization, but even more so by how humans operate those machines. Though the fundamentals of agricultural machinery are basically the same, the technology, size, scope and capabilities have evolved dramatically. Keeping pace with the changes is how farmers “house” their equipment.  Over the last decade the single panel hydraulic agricultural door has become the “door of choice” for farmers across the country. Doors for agriculture machine sheds and doors for barns are transitioning from roller, slider and bi-fold doors towards the superior technology of the hydraulic door.

 

 

Strong and well sealed, the hydraulic door is easy to install on pole barns, post & frame buildings and pre engineered steel buildings. The Hydroswing® agricultural door can be found on thousands of farms across the country and is taking its place among the farming world’s technological advances.  Hydroswing hydraulic doors are also an easy way for farmers to enlarge existing openings in sheds and barns.

Door markets in the United States are keeping pace with modern technology and have started to move toward efficiency and “in life” service cost. Reduced pricing and quality workmanship are quickly making hydraulic doors one of the many advances that simplify and improve agriculture.

 

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